Georgia’s youngest Covid-19 victim attended church where 2 elderly members died from the virus

A 7-year-old Georgia boy who died of Covid-19 attended a Chatham County church where two elderly members had died after testing positive for the coronavirus, according to county Coroner Bill Wessinger.

The African American boy is the youngest victim of the coronavirus in Georgia, according to data compiled by the state health department.

State health officials are investigating the three deaths, Wessinger told CNN on Saturday.

The boy suffered a seizure while taking a shower, according to Wessinger. He was rushed to a hospital, where he died.

He lived in coastal Chatham County, and had no underlying health conditions.

“Every COVID-19 death we report is tragic, but to lose someone so young is especially heart-breaking,” Dr. Lawton Davis, the health director for the Coastal Health District, said in a statement.

“We know that older individuals and those with underlying conditions are at higher risk of complications, but this is a disease everyone should take seriously,” Davis said.

The boy’s death isn’t the first among children in the US. In Florida alone, at least seven minors have died from Covid-19. Last month, a 9-year-old girl who had no underlying medical conditions was the youngest to die in the state.

In Georgia, a second grader tested positive for Covid-19 after attending the first day of school this week, the Cherokee County School District told CNN.

Chatham County has reported 5,441 confirmed cases of the virus and 74 deaths.

The state of Georgia has reported 204,895 cases and 4,026 deaths.

“Please watch out for each other, wear a mask in public, wash your hands often, and stay home if you’re sick,” Davis said. “A community-wide crisis demands a community-wide response, and we all must do our part to keep each other safe.”

The numbers in this report were released by the Coastal Health District and the Georgia Department of Health and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project.